About your Search

20121201
20121231
SHOW
Cavuto 7
( more )
STATION
FBC 39
CNBC 37
CSPAN 33
MSNBCW 29
CNNW 23
CSPAN2 20
KQED (PBS) 9
KQEH (PBS) 8
CNN 7
KRCB (PBS) 5
LINKTV 4
KCSM (PBS) 3
MSNBC 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 299
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 303 (some duplicates have been removed)
for greece's rural population. >> but first, here are some other stories making headlines. thousands of sunni muslims are continuing their protests against the iraqi government, demanding the resignation of the prime minister, accusing him of sectarian politics. that's after bodyguards of the sunni finance minister were arrested on terrorism charges last week. >> the president of the central african republic has appealed to france and the u.s. for help against a rebel coalition that has vowed to topple his government. france has declined to intervene against the rebels who have already taken several towns and are now advancing on the capital. >> heavy snow has paralyzed large parts of eastern canada. in montreal, traffic came to a virtual standstill. police are telling people to stay at home, as some areas are expected to receive almost half a year of additional snow. well, we are going to a short break. after we come back, we will look at europe's crisis year 2012. >> we will find out how it will be a year to forget for one of germany's top swimmers. stay with us. >> welcome back. in just th
? check out greece. that's what happens when a country avoids making tough fiscal decisions for too long. >>> a top republican pollster about what went wrong on their side. a lot of information coming here and why if republicans don't change the way they do business they may be on the losing end of elections for years to come. plus, the black helicopter crowd is at it again. republicans in the senate reject a united nations treaty to ban discrimination against the disabled. they say it would allow u.n. officials to come into this country and force home-schooled children into government-run, that is public schools. senator john kerry joins us to cut through the nonsense. >>> also tonight, the simpson's mr. burns gives us a rich man's look at the fiscal cliff. >> think of the economy as a car and the rich man is the driver. if you don't give the driver, he'll drive you over a cliff. >> that's an aside show and this is "hardball," the place for politics. >>> never too early for pollsters to start head to 2016. guess who's looking very strong? hillary clinton. a new abc news/washington post
in neighboring turkey, lebanon, and jordan. a much smaller number have made their way to greece. this report from lesbos just off the coast of turkey. >> the immigrants who wash ashore on the greek islands are now struggling with their first european winter. they are somalis, afghanistan annies, and, increates -- increasingly, syrians. all at a camp run by volunteers who provide food and shelter the this is ahmed, who has just arrived from aleppo with a vague plan to find his brothner athens. >> our life is destroyed in syria. we cannot stay in syria. the war airplanes float in the sky and bombing the houses, we cannot stay in syria. >> the turkish mainland is not far behind me. it's not far away but the journey is very dangerous. the boats supplied by people smugglers are often old and in bad condition, and at this time be year the seas could be very rough. not everyone makes it across. these were afghanis. more than 20 drowned. here is the only survivor, who was fished half-dead and freezing cold out of the sea by greek coast guards. now trying to call friends and family to tell them he's alive
are your percentage chances that the u.s. will eventually end up like greece? >> well, look, if i could just answer that, i'm an optimist on america. i believe in america. i'd buy it, you know, if america was a publicly-traded company, i'd buy the stock every day. this country and this economy is tremendously resilient. and one of the great things, i think, about our book is it's got ideas that require action in washington, it's also at state level, individual level and there's some business and corporate level. so, you know, what are the odds? i would, you know, i'm an on the optimist. i would say we will get back to growth. >> kevin? >> the oecd, which is an organization that studies large, developed nations just did a big study to try to identify how big the policy challenges facing the nations around the world are. and they estimated something called the fiscal adjustment, and the fiscal adjustment for greece that they need -- which is either the immediate tax increase or the immediate reduction in spending necessary to make it so that their economy doesn't just explode is about 3%
greece would have a worse depression than the great depression in the u.s. >> brown: a player in campaign politics, but what of the current debt debate? we talk with tea party ally, matt kibbe. >> warner: and as e.p.a. chief lisa jackson steps down, we assess the track record of the administration's environmental agency. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january
that a crucial vote on egypt's constitution could be delayed. we've got the latest. greece's debt crisis turns its hospitals into virtual ses pools. how it is spawning health disaster that could reach far beyond its borders. piles of money coming up. ♪ . melissa: now onto the middle east. the pressure not letting up for egyptian predent mohammed morsi. reports say he is ready to postpone the scheduled vote on the new constitution which would cement his sweeping powers. earlier today protesters broke through the barriers around the presidential palace. police fired tear gas at a crowd of almost 1000 people out seed cairo tv studios. we have a fox news contributor, specializing in middleeast counterterrorism affairs. lisa, it looks like things are getting more out of control all the time. people keep saying ts is going to calm down. what is your, what is your take on it? >> well, as long as moi's factions, the muslim brotherhood will remain steadfast in a power grab d maintaining their agenda, the people, opposition saying this is not what we fought for the company will remain in perpetual rev
. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: much of the world paused today to observe christmas. the day brought all the traditional rites of faith for christians and a new urgency to calls for calm in the troubled corners of the globe. thousands of the faithful greeted pope benedict xvi today at his cal bony overlooking st. peter's square. in that timeless setting,
; the impact of austerity in greece; the tea party and the fiscal cliff and the administration's environmental record. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: wall street was down much of the day, but trimmed its losses after news that the house will convene sunday to focus on the fiscal cliff. in the end, the dow jones industrial average shed 18 points to close at 13,096. the nasdaq fell four points to close under 2,986. also today, the labor department reported the number of new claims for unemployment benefits fell this week to the lowest level since march of 2008. president obama is urging dockworkers and shippers to avoid a crippling strike at atlantic and gulf coast ports. it would be the first since 1977. the workers' union contract expires this weekend, and a white house spokesman said today the two sides need to agree on a contract extension as soon as possible. talks broke down last week in a dispute over wages and royalties. the christmas season storm that blasted the south and midwest swept across the upper northeast and new england today and the death
. italy, spain, portugal, greece and ireland, hungry are in terrible shape. serious terrible shape. and because some folks don't pay attention to numbers, here's a chance for a statistic to help. students of mine, professors who came to the united states to study the universities where i taught. now professors at the university of acton, major universities increased. today their salaries as we speak are 40 percent less than what they were in may of 2010. try to imagine yourself in a job that you've kept in which the money you get every week is 40% less. police, fire, school teachers, social workers, you name it. .. governments in france and germany have been very frightened since they too are facing an economic crisis and they too are trying to solve it by making demands of their people to pay for something we come in to. they have chosen to use a very dangerous strategy particularly warm germany and the strategy goes like this. we the government are your friends, you the german working-class, because we are not going to allow you to be made to pay for those lazy southern european
? >> greece is a perfect example when you continue to borrow from the future, which is what we're doing right now. so if you don't deal with entitlement reform now, if you don't say to people under 50, things are going to be different, what happens is you get to the point where you're in greece and you tell an 85-year-old, you used to get $150 euros a month and now you're not. chris: the medicine is the cure. >> the comparisons between the united states and greece which republicans like to make are so wildly -- chris: what is the apt comparison if this country doesn't get its act together? >> the united states really is unique. we are still the world's store -- chris: can we bank on the fact that we're the currency of the world and we can keep running enormous deficits? >> we have the ability to issue debt in our own currency and make it credibility. nobody else can do that and people keep buying it. two more quick points, chris, about this what we are seeing now. first, the president has taken leadership of his own party, something he really didn't do during his first term and right out of t
of 8 months to the next federal election in germany, for instance. greece therefore is the sick person europe. of the world. meanwhile, the united states of america is ungovernable. you have a system in this country that was created to create this country as an ungovernable state. you have congress, the president canceling each other out. how the president -- whoever the president might be -- do anything? you have china -- finding it impossible to provide a replacement for the demand that the west has done away with. so, i do not have an answer for your question. bewilderment. >> my question is about consumer demand and the extent to which the old system depended on it. if we do not have it to the same degree, could there possibly be a new economy? i cannot know how to say all of these in the right economic terms. i will say what i am thinking and see what you make out of it. its teams like all the economy's got to a point where it had to be based on growth. it could not just be sustainable. it had to grow. and that meant more consumers. so, then, that led to a lot of things ecological
corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference. they issued a statement today at the end of the gulf cooperation council's annual summit. the statement gave no details. the six u.s. allied countries, also called for swift international action to end the bloodshed in syria. in central asia, a military plane crashed early this morning in kazakhstan killing 27 people including the country's head of border security. the russian-made aircraft went down near a so
the latest. greece's debt crisis turns its hospitals into virtual ses pools. how it is spawning health disaster that could reach far beyond its borders. piles of money coming up. ♪ . [ abdul-raid ] i've been working since i was about 16. you know, one job or the other. the moment i could access the retirement plan, i just became firm about it -- you know, it's like it just hits you fast. you know, you start thinking about what's really important here. ♪ music is a universal language. but when i was in an accent... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i neverissed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people lookingut for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. melissa: now onto the middle east. the pressure not letting up for egyptian president mohammed morsi. reports say he is ready to postpone the scheduled vote on the new constitution which would cement
and stalin of -- >> dividing up -- >> yeah, the british will get 90% of greece. the russians get 90% of bulgaria, and hungary, and divide it up that way. it was pretty cynical. but when roosevelt dies, in april of '45, his last telegram to churchill was, we always have these minor disafremonts with the russians about we end up resolving them so let's not make a big deal. no reason we can't maintain friendship after the war. when truman gets in there in 1945, april 12, he immediately takes a different course. roosevelt's alliance with the wartime alliance with the soviets was still very strong at that point. but truman turns to advisers who roosevelt never trusted in the first place, didn't pay any heed to, people like burns. the second day of the 13th -- burns in south carolina, a private plane, and as -- burns gives them same message, the soviets are break all their agreements. they cannot trusted, and within two weeks the u.s. policy tornado the soviet union is going to change in april of 1945. by the time there's that big meeting on april 23rd with molotov and april 23rd, the uni
of greece. if the long run greece would have low unemployment, but they do not, but yes, we're going to go a percent, if it happens the worse case scenario, but in five years we won't be not able to borrow money. >> brenda: julian, you can go ahead and respond. >> first of all, the ernst & young study has been debunked over and over. and number two, the bush tax cuts, if you let the bush tax cuts. the crs study was a republican study and found the same thing as the cbo. if you let bush tax cuts expire on everybody, yes, you would have negative economic impact. the two staetudies done recentl shows the top two rates, top 2%, virtually no impact. to jonas' point if you raise taxes a the lot and cut spending a lot and so austerity plan, that would have an impact. democrats were for pouring more money into the compli with stimulus and republicans wanted austerity and jonas' point is an argument against what conservatives were pushing for. >> brenda: all right. toby. >> what's the question? >> driving a smart car. >> and we did a survey of 1500 small business peoples more in the 2%, revenue or
the political crisis. >>> while in greece they held off protesters launching molotov cocktails. >>> the president is taking the fiscal cliff solution to the people. plus, a modern day five story ripped through the pages of a tom clancey novel. "early today" starts right now. >> announcer: this is "early today" for friday, december 7th, 2012. >>> good mornings,er one. i'm lynn berry. we're going to start with breaking news out of japan. a strong 7.3 earthquake has struck off the country's northeast coast beneath the sea bed. it shook buildings as far as tokyo and warnings were issued for miyagi prefecture. there's no risk for a widespread tsunami. we'll bring you the very latest. >>> elsewhere, all eyes are on cairo this morning as turmoil has once again overtaken egypt's capitol, this time in response to a political explosive power grab by the president, mohammed morsi. right now army tanks surround the presidential palace as thousands of protesters shout topple the regime, the same chant heard during the regime of hosni mubarak. in a tv show morsi said absolute powers he grant
♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ imus in the morning ♪ >> you won't believe how bad things are in greece, but believe this, they are getting their bailout money. it came through today. good morning, everyone, 50 billion dollars flowing into greece. it will never be repaid. new figures show the country in a deep depression. 11 million people owe a half trillion dollars. back home, speaker boehner and president obama are a little closer to a deal and both have given some ground on taxes and spending. the markets like it. right now john boehner is trying to sell it to his party. across the country, record gun sales over the weekend. "varney & company" about to begin. i always wait until the last minute. can i still ship a gift in time r christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. >> we have breaking news right now on the debate within the republican party about the fiscal cliff deal. rich edson has what, what is being discussed here, what is the latest, rich? >> a plan b on
from becoming greece. no more borrowing without addressing why we're in debt to begin with. that's where the real chance for change occurs, at the debt ceiling debate. >> we're joined now by ralph sill voe. it's christmas eve. do you have some plans to do? >> it's an austerity christmas, actually. just a couple friends getting together and a couple of friends getting together and having a nice meal. >> it is not an austerity christmas. >> it actually is. we haven't had the greatest year. everything we hoped would happen. we thought this economy was going to turn around at the summer period. >> ralph, if you take a look at the stock market concerns, the dax is up 20%. >> there will be plenty of alcohol to forget. >> do you think we're going to manage to see some type of a resolution on the fiscal cliff? we're seeing a lot of finger pointing now and hearing from both sides saying it's in the other side's interest to delay these negotiations. >> i've had conversations with people in new york and working on trade floors. what i've been told by them is there is a huge number of meetin
it from becoming greece and save social security and medicare and to anybody listening to this program, i'll raise the debt ceiling only if we save medicare and social security from insolvency and prevent this country from becoming greece. >> prevent this country from becoming greece. what is your reaction to that? >> absolute and utter nonsense. this country is not becoming greece. this country -- this country, frankly, has a big unemployment problem. we have a deficit problem in the short term, not the long term. it's not a real problem now. our bonds selling higher than before and lower interest rates. it's not an immediate problem. he's saying what's worse. what he is saying is use blackmail on the entire economy like a gangster. pity if it happens to blow up. not increasing the debt ceiling -- >> already did that before. they have done it before. >> they have. >> and will do it again. >> frankly, that is obnoxious beyond belief. the president should not concede or negotiate on that basis at all. >> the president is adamant on the fact that's not a part of this conversation. >> it can
to talk about greece or not, whether i want to dive straight into the banking union and what chance have we possibly got of getting agreement. >> let's talk about greece, much more fun. no, greece we have to get out of the way. is the debt by back program going to be successful, everyone nds it will. we know that's the one little lynchpin on which everything else rests. so if it's not, the money will not flow, but everybody insists as when he headed into the euro group meeting yesterday that it will be successful. that's also what what we hear from the greeks. there's a bit of arm fwising, but it will probably go through. and then lo and behold ahead of the actual summit in the morning, they can sign up the check for the next greek installment also we hope. we're also closer to a little rescue package for cypress. spanish aid package for the banks is on track. so that was the working list last night. another thing on the to-do list. the head of the euro group confirmed last night that, no, i will not extend anything now, i will definitely leave as head of the euro group at the end of thi
't get. see if you can do better. it wouldn't take much. >>> greece's national bank euro bank alfa and perez says they need the money following disclosures by the lenders last week. greece is concerned that the 50 billion euros set aside for bank recapitalization will be enough to cover the shortfall. >>> and the italian treasury is holding its last debt sale of the year. traders are expecting to see solid demand for the paper after rome placed nearly 12 billion euros of shorted dated paper just yesterday. still, they warn investors could become more discerning in the new year especially as the italian electric tore ral race on thursday. italy expects to raise around 10 billion euros next year. less supply. we know there's still plenty of investor demand and no sign necessarily of re-ignited concern about the longer term health of these -- you could call them peripheral economies. >> no. things have really improved. it's all still down to the ecb's pledge to support these countries if they fulfill the conditions. especially in the case of italy. the country is fulfilling conditions
. greece unveiling that $10 billion eurobond buyback. a 52-week high in france and germany. our road map this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on
risk at the moment? we'll keep giving greece money because we can't afford not to. we're still waiting maybe for the ecb to step in. what is the till rask? anything we didn't know about? >> lots of things we don't know. that's the problem. it is the unknown unknown as they say. i think greece is probably too small to view. i think what really bothers me is spain which i think clearly bothers the whole market. the question, a growth going to fall off a cliff or whether it muddle through and a bailout will be sufficient. as you say, we don't know the answer to that question. that remains the tail risk. until we do get close to a resolution, i'm not going to turn massively bullish. >> what's your view on that? >> i think i go along very much with what he's saying. >> what is your view on what happens to spanish growth? >> i think spain has a lot of problems at the moment. it's not seeing a lot in the domestic market. not seeing it move toward an export. in which case spanish growth is going to be very, very weak for some time to come. >> all right. good to see you. thanks very much. alan
this administration. we have to reduce spending. we are heading down the same path that greece did. right now the democrats are talking about raising taxes on the top 2%. if we do not stop the spending, we will be back here again maybe one year from now saying, maybe we need to raise taxes on the top 25% or 50%. then everybody will be taxed and we will run out of money. what is going to happen is the federal government is not going to be able to take care of its obligations. you are not going to be able to have safety nets. social security and medicare are going broke. we have to fix those of those who are dependent on those systems can get them. continuing to spend money like both parties have been doing the, wild spending is going to lead us to be just like greece. we are not going to be able to take care of the poor or the needy or take care of senior citizens. we have to stop spending. host: this is fiscal year 2010, but it has not changed significantly in terms of percentage. 41% of the federal budget. not defense appropriations 19%. defense spending 20%. the national debt 6%. we're in t
sides warning they may go the way of greece. taking away two different lessons. who has it right? our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to work here in america and supporting wind and solar. though all energy development comes with some risk, we're committed to safely and responsibly producing natural gas. it's not a dream. america's natural gas... putting us in control of our energy future, now. olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? i had[ designer ]eeling enough of just covering up day! my moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. i decided enough is enough. ♪ [ spa lady ] i started enbrel. it's clinically proven to provide clearer skin.
ban them and it -- >> greg: the funny thing is we talk about greece, but before there was greece, there was detroit. detroit is greece. if it was only the acropolis. dead city. people left because they couldn't make a living, the unions suffocate pod tenial. >> bob: true about toledo and cleveland and cincinnati? the northern cities that have had bleed of workers? >> eric: i will make a wage with you. now that snyder signs it off and right to work, i bet an auto company goes -- brand new, never done business before in detroit. >> kimberly: you will lose this bet, bob. >> eric: coming up, 2004 south korean singer rapped about killing americans in 2019 and is invited to perform for president obama. ♪ ♪ >> eric: maybe not. we will gangmam bang it out next. and make sure you go to the facebook page. we are updating and posting facebook.com/thefivefnc. click like. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ [ malennouncer ] it's tt time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only
into the southern belly of the nazi empire, italy and the balkans, regaining greece which is a tremendous story. everyone talks about eastern europe. as an outsider i see what about the british when they went back into greece in 1944 and started bombing the streets of athens and killing the people, the communist resistors that fought against the nazis. the british were ruthless. that is another point. people say look at what stalin did in poland. he broke the altar. i don't believe they did. i will tell you more about that. look what the british did. but we did increase in the cold war period, the early cold war period we and the truman doctrine of 47 to 49, we had american advisers and early vietnam there were already over increase read the the british coal is truly to get back the mediterranean, along the region's coming get iran back in the conflict in iran in 1945. beyond that, it's crucial. we showed that in the beautiful maps. he gets to the far east and it is the richest resources around known to britain, not us. so then it isn't -- you can't dhaka the u.s. soviet relations without talki
't want to become greece or france or one of these stagnant slow growth welfare states. think evidence is very clear that fiscal policy does matter for an economy's performance. doesn't mean we have a recession if taxes go up but it does mean that government will be bigger and our growth rate in the long run maybe instead of 2.7, it is 2.6. that doesn't sound like much but because of compounding it adds up. adam: dan, i don't think there is any danger we become greece or france in a lot of ways. we're not a socialist country yet and greece is a whole different ball of wax. rich, the discussion about the economy, the spending cuts that they're talking about do put people out of work and that would have a negative effect on the economy, would it not? >> it would, adam. real quick, a bit of news here. president obama will deliver a statement at 4:45, something i imagine we'll cover live here on fox business. adam: we will. >> 5:45 president obama deliver as statement here at the white house. as far as spending cuts are concerned, you see this argument, you typically hear republicans say,
, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down like in 2008. it is often said in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding disparate
as greece or portugal ornever, but they are just talking about a few ring keating billions. a trillion word is really unique to the united states. and i think that is what is going to kill us, the absolute numbers. germany can affo to bailout greece. nobody can afford to bailout the united states, and i would agree actually th bill archer that i think he understated. if you take the total debt situation, you're talking about just shy of three-quarters of a million dollars for the -- per american family. so you get a cup of coffee from a waitress in the diner, think of loading three-quarters of a million dollars of debt on to her shoulders for what? for what? does nothing to show for. lou: her children and their children that will be paying a large measure of that. great to have you with us. making spirits bright. and after america with one of the ugliest pictures of an american cadaver toe tag to. >> doom and the oven is the into debt. lou: at least some balance here. you know how much are presidenta taxes on our middle-class. >> the bill is passed. lou: the house passes the stem emigration
it from becoming greece. the game you're talking about is small ball. you're talking about raising the ceiling for 11 days. how about doing something big these not liberal. every idea is a liberal idea. how about manning up, mr. president and use your mandate to bring this country together to stop us from becoming greece. >> man up. with jim demint leaving, a new poll shows who they wants a his replacement. put your votes in. a very funny south carolinian. the one and only stephen colbert. the comedian miami tops the list. this is an honest poll. 20%. tim scott comes in second. colbert addressed the speculation around his potential candidacy on his show last night. >> there's already a twitter page, facebook, draft colbert website. i can tell you having done a show with him in charleston, he's an absolute rock star in that state. >> yes, i am a rock star in south carolina and not just because i ended my rally there with herman cain by biting the head off a dove. now, my network contract prohibits me from taking on another full-time job, so the sfl senate would be perfect. >>> south
greece and half of europe. neil: some say we'll be like greece if in is no deal by the end of the year? >> i do not agree. we have to negotiate, the presiden needs to get involved. neil: the language changed little bit today, i notice when they are not attacking each other out in open, then progress must be being made. that is what led to rumors of a potential imminent deal yesterday. now they are back to sniping, speaker boehner and nancy pelosi and others going back and forth, that leads me to believe that things are falling apart, do you get that sense? >> we see here -- hear they are negotiating, we'll get a deal, then we hear the fighting going on, if the fighting continues, we're not getting a deal. i don't want a deal if it is just the same old deal that is not good for america. neil: do you worry, as i guy has been around the neck of the woods for a few years, that republicans are losing their verve. some more conservative members ve said we lost an election but we did not los everything that we stand for, yet, everything i hear talked about, are concessions on part of the repu
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 303 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)